09/01/2007

Use of Adapted Bicycles on the Learning of Conventional Cycling by Children with Mental Retardation

 

By: Tammy L. Burt, David L. Porretta, and Richard E. Klein

Abstract: This study investigated the use of adapted bicycles on the acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of conventional cycling by seven children with mild mental retardation. Feedback was used in addition to the adapted bicycles and consisted of pedal rate, head position, and steering participation. A multiple probe design was used. Participants were required to ride as far as possible for each trial. Results indicated that 100% of participants demonstrated acquisition of conventional cycling. Maintenance was demonstrated by 71.4% of participants, and generalization was demonstrated by 42.9% of participants. Results are interpreted from an ecological perspective.

September 2007, Vol 42, Issue 3

By: Tammy L. Burt, David L. Porretta, and Richard E. Klein

Abstract: This study investigated the use of adapted bicycles on the acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of conventional cycling by seven children with mild mental retardation. Feedback was used in addition to the adapted bicycles and consisted of pedal rate, head position, and steering participation. A multiple probe design was used. Participants were required to ride as far as possible for each trial. Results indicated that 100% of participants demonstrated acquisition of conventional cycling. Maintenance was demonstrated by 71.4% of participants, and generalization was demonstrated by 42.9% of participants. Results are interpreted from an ecological perspective.